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17 Quotes from Social Media Visionaries

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17For some people social media is in their DNA. For others, it simply is not. This compilation of 17 Quotes from Social Media Visionaries will allow the experienced and inexperienced to gain insight to the very core of social media. These are not the 17 best or most inspirational quotes. They are quotes that will open the mind of the average business person when looking at their social media presence. They are quotes that will remind the seasoned public relations professional what social media is all about. They are – never mind, just read for yourself:

  1. Social media allows us to behave in ways that we are hardwired for in the first place – as humans. We can get frank recommendations from other humans instead of from faceless companies. – Francois Gossieaux, The Hyper-Social Organization: Eclipse Your Competition by Leveraging Social Media
  2. Social media spark a revelation that we, the people, have a voice, and through the democratization of content and ideas we can once again unite around common passions, inspire movements, and ignite change. – Brian Solis, Engage: The Complete Guide for Brands and Businesses to Build, Cultivate, and Measure Success in the New Web
  3. How can you squander even one more day not taking advantage of the greatest shifts of our generation? How dare you settle for less when the world has made it so easy for you to be remarkable? – Seth Godin, Guerrilla Marketing for Home-Based Businesses
  4. Passion is the gasoline of social media. – Jay Baer
  5. In Social Media the “squeaky wheel” gets the oil. You have to put yourself out there, to find people who will relate or even debate with you, depending on what you are looking for. – Jessica Northey
  6. A brand is no longer what we tell the consumer it is – it is what consumers tell each other it is. – Scott Cook, Founder of Intuit
  7. We don’t have a choice on whether we do social media, the question is how well we do it. – Erik Qualman, Author
  8. Quit counting fans, followers and blog subscribers like bottle caps. Think, instead, about what you’re hoping to achieve with and through the community that actually cares about what you’re doing. – Amber Cadabra
  9. Think like a publisher, not a marketer. –  David Meerman Scott, Marketing Strategist
  10. Our head of social media is the customer. –  McDonald’s
  11. Social media allows big companies to act small again – Jay Baer
  12. Engage rather than sell … Work as a co-creator, not a marketer. – Tom H. C. Anderson
  13. Social Media puts the “public” into PR and the “market” into marketing. – Chris Brogan
  14. Stop Marketing. Start engaging.- Scott Stratten
  15. You are what you tweet. – Alex Tew
  16. Don’t say anything online that you wouldn’t want plastered on a billboard with your face on it. – Erin Bury
  17. Social media is just a buzzword until you come up with a plan. – Unknown

Which quote did you like best? Is there another social media quote that should be added to the list?

Tweets DO NOT = Mine

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Tweets = mine. You see it the Twitter profile of thousands, but are they really yours? The answer is “no.”

Tweets are only kept to yourself and a close group of friends if you have a private profile. However, if your profile is public, the tweets are never really yours. There are many instances when individuals get in a good amount of trouble for tweets posted. Sometimes they mistakenly post a personal tweet with the corporate or client account and sometimes it is related to their own personal account. No matter if you are the janitor, the brand manager, or the CEO, what you say can have a positive or in some cases very negative effect on a brand.

Here are a couple of cases when an individual’s tweets had some very negative effects for the brand they represent.

  1. The not-so-personal account. James Andrews of Ketchum PR hurt the reputation of his PR firm when he posted this tweet “True confession but I’m in one of those towns where I scratch my head and say ‘I would die if I had to live here!’” What he didn’t realize is that some employees of FedEx read this tweet when he landed in Memphis for corporate training on social media. FedEx fired Ketchum as a direct result. FedEx, being based in Memphis, cares very much about their hometown. When Andrew was speaking he represented FedEx as a brand even though he did not realize it. Read about the incident in Memphis’ Commercial Appeal.
  2. The oops-I-forgot-I-was-logged-into-the-corporate-account. Chrysler has had its fair share of issues over the last five years. The last thing they needed was somebody speaking negatively for their brand. However, the employee managing the Chrysler Twitter account made a mistake. Instead of posting to their personal account, they tweeted this message from the Chrysler corporate account: “I find it ironic that Detroit is known as the #motorcity and yet no one here knows how to f#@%ing drive.” The company handling the Chrysler account, New Media Strategies, was fired immediately from the account. The person that made the mistake was also fired from New Media Strategies. Read about the whole incident here.

Why do these events matter to a brand? Twitter is public. Everyone can read it, and they do. Especially when you think they’re not reading or they won’t see it if you delete it really quickly. Think about when you were younger and your mom would tell you, “If you don’t have anything good to say, don’t say it at all.” That applies to social media, especially when you represent a brand.

How will you change the way you communicate on social media?

Article originally published on the Talent Zoo blog Beneath the Brand here:  http://www.talentzoo.com/beneath-the-brand/blog_news.php?articleID=15965

If you tweet it, they will read it.

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Is your social media coordinator qualified to speak for your brand? Have you ever actually thought about it?

1030887_53077079Social networking has been one of the number one things companies and ad agencies are focusing on today. Nearly everything is digital and has to happen now. This isn’t a bad thing, it just opens up to a new type of thinking. We need to remember that social networking is no longer just an add-on. It is a very large part of your company. Anything that is posted via social media from your corporate account represents your company. It is the quickest way to talk to your fan base.

If you tweet it, they will read it. Really think about that. We need to choose wisely when allowing someone to run your social media accounts. They speak for the entire brand. I cannot stress that enough. The reason I am focusing on this so much is because of a few recent instances of social media neglect. This neglect leads to a whole lot of crisis management. Here are two examples:

  1. Kitchenaid’s presidential election woes. The perpetweeter, person who tweets for a company and commits a social crime,  thought they were logged into their own personal profile. They were wrong. Logged into the company account, they continue on a derogatory rant about President Obama tagging #nbcpolitics via @KitchenAidUSA. Read the entire story here. This is where you must separate work and home life. Up until this point it seems as if a majority of social media is being updated by lower level coordinators instead of strategic thinkers. Although Kitchenaid did a good job cleaning up this mess, it was tweeted and it was read.
  2. Kim Kardashian inspired “Aurora” dress from Celeb Boutique. The shooting in Aurora, Colorado during a midnight screening of the Batman movie “Dark Knight Rises” was a horrible tragedy. The perpetweeter updating the Celeb Boutique twitter profile had no idea what had happened. They saw ‘Aurora’ as a trending topic and without looking into it further tweeted about the Kim Kardashian inspired Aurora dress. Read the entire story here. Before you make comments that can affect an entire company you must at least do a small amount of background research. It was tweeted and it was read.

With our evolving digital landscape there needs to be someone highly qualified sending out the tweets, Facebook posts, Instagram photos, and anything else that touches your target audience. You should treat this as carefully as you would treat a press release or press conference. Just because a person has a Facebook profile doesn’t make them a social media guru. It doesn’t matter what age the person running your social media is. All that matters is the experience that they have and the intimate understanding of your business and industry. Do your research and select a qualified person(s) to update your social accounts. Make sure this person understands your brand and maintains the professionalism your brand deserves. The time to act on this is before something happens.

What steps will you take to make sure your social media coordinator is qualified?

Rethink Your Press Releases Now

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Throw all of your standard cookie cutter press release ideas out. Nobody wants to read the same press release time and again. Would you? They’ll notice and just stop paying attention. Over the years I have read a large number of press releases that simply don’t cut it. Because of that, here are 5 tips to help take your press release to the next level.

  1. Include a quote. Quotes from high-ranking individuals, especially a respected third-party outside your organization, can really elevate your press release from good to great. It’s important because it brings a more personal connection to the reader, it increases visibility in search, and its helps complete your story.  news
  2. Story is important, so make it newsworthy. You need to know why someone would want to read it before you write it. What makes this press release worth writing? Give it a thought. Then, craft the press release to focus on one big takeaway for the reader. In today’s world, there are countless press releases coming out each day but only a few of them are ever actually read. Every story will be different so this is why the cookie cutter approach doesn’t work. Get them hooked, focus on the brand, and leave them wanting more.
  3. Avoid overused words and phrases such as “world class.” You can evoke the feelings of being world class and cutting edge without having to say it. These words are something people have come to expect when reading or writing press releases. Needless to say, it doesn’t help you stand out. If you think you have no other option, try writing the same sentence 3 or 4 different ways without using the overused word in question. If that doesn’t work you’re focusing too hard on one sentence. It’s time to go back to my second point and think about the whole story again.
  4. Use keywords appropriately. Search Engine Optimization (SEO) is a powerful thing. The quote will definitely help your SEO efforts, especially if your quote if from someone respected in your field. But, when I say used keywords appropriately I mean it. Not everyone reading your press release will be within your industry. With this in mind, make it understandable to the average person. Sometimes PR writers get too stuck on fitting in all of the industry jargon that they lose readership. It’s still okay to fit in your keywords, just make sure it makes sense to your neighbor, your boss, and your spouse.
  5. Lastly, the first sentence makes the biggest difference. It’s like making a first impression. Start strong and let the reader know why they should read more. In the first sentence of this post I told you to throw out your normal ideas of a press release. Whether you liked hearing that or not it intrigued you to read more. Here’s a fine example. In a recent press release out of General Motors titled Tonawanda Turns the Page, their first sentence says, “Four million, one hundred and forty-nine thousand.” Now I want to read more. Its a big number and it’s a far from average way to start a press release. They go on to talk about engine production with the lowest warranty costs in all of GM. This could have been just another stale article but the first sentence captures you from the start. Set up your press release for greatness and make your first impression count.

What other ways have you found to take your press release to the next level?