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Cadillac is Back at Hero Status

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bob_ferguson_cadillacOn June 14, 2013, Bob Ferguson, Vice President of Global Cadillac, spoke to a large group of industry professionals at the Adcraft Club of Detroit GM Day. Ferguson is clearly focused on the long-term brand strategy to bring Cadillac back. After some neglect and declining market share for more than thirty years, Cadillac recently has had its highest sales spike since 1976.

Ferguson focused his discussion on Cadillac as an epic tales of sorts. The hero is the automobile, with various sections of the story revealing its true character. Ferguson describes it as a tale with three acts.

  1. Act One: Cadillac is described as the hero in its infancy. It is born. It leads. It is iconic. It holds the virtues of the American public. As many know, Act One lasted for many years, from approximately 1902 through 1976.
  2. Act Two: Things were shifting and the hero that is Cadillac was lazily focusing on size and its past status. Cadillac, the hero, slumped. It was caught off guard by its enemies and the new idea of what an iconic car should be.  Act Two lasted a lot less longer than the previous act, from approximately 1976–2012.
  3. Act Three: Cadillac is described simply as redemption. The hero…

Read my entire article originally published on the Talent Zoo blog Beneath the Brand here: http://www.talentzoo.com/beneath-the-brand/blog_news.php?articleID=17905

Cadillac is Going Rogue

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2014-cadillac-ctsCadillac is “Going Rogue.” No, not in the Sarah Palin-esque style after which she so eloquently titled her memoir. Rather, in its advertising switch from Fallon Worldwide to three firms from the Interpublic Group of Companies simply called “Rogue.” Rogue is comprised of Campbell Ewald (Detroit), Hill Holiday (Boston), and Lowe (London).

“Our open architecture model brings together outstanding IPG talent with deep knowledge of both autos and the luxury consumer — domestically and around the world,” said Michael Roth, Chairman and CEO of Interpublic Group. “Our offering will be comprised of the exceptional creative capabilities of Hill Holliday, a powerful base of operations in Detroit thanks to Campbell Ewald, and Lowe’s dynamic international network.”

Back in March, Bill Shea at Crain’s Detroit Business told the public that Cadillac would be taking the reins of its advertising back from Fallon Worldwide and giving it to Campbell Ewald. Tuesday, Shea announced that “Campbell Ewald hired as part of Cadillac ad account switch.” The focus has been on Campbell Ewald because of its long history…

Read the entire article on the Talent Zoo blog Beyond Madison Avenue at: http://www.talentzoo.com/beyond-madison-ave/blog_news.php?articleID=17668

Merging Ideas and Businesses: Mad Men Philosophies

Ted Chaough (Kevin Rahm), Don Draper (Jon Hamm) and Peggy Olson (Elisabeth Moss) - Mad Men - Season 6, Episode 6 - Photo Credit: Michael Yarish/AMC

Ted Chaough (Kevin Rahm), Don Draper (Jon Hamm) and Peggy Olson (Elisabeth Moss) – Mad Men – Season 6, Episode 6 – Photo Credit: Michael Yarish/AMC

“For Immediate Release” was a perfect name for this last episode of Mad Men. This episode of Mad Men has truly been the best and most action-packed episode of season six thus far. Out of all the infidelity, french subtitles, and lost business, comes a revival of Roger. Through a VIP airport lounge girl, Roger Sterling meets Mikey O’Brien of Chevy. The two hit it off and Roger wins a spot in the creative pitch for their newest model car.

The night before the pitch comes and Don Draper is sitting at a Detroit bar – not surprised. Ted Chaough of Cutler, Gleason and Chaough walks in. Chaough believes that now that their are two smaller agencies in the mix, they now cancel each other out. So for the fun of it, they play a little game of “show me yours and I’ll show you mine.” After they run through a version of their pitches, Don laments that he should sell his brain to Chevy in a jar while Ted suggests they both leave now. Don slyly says, “We. That’s interesting.” It is interesting, especially since Joan berated him earlier in the show for never using that word. Don takes the reins and tells Ted to decide what to pitch while he figures out how to convince Chevy it was their idea. As simple as that, the merger begins. In the time of Mad Men, Campbell Ewald had already been handling Chevy’s business for decades. For this model, in the fictional world, SCDP and CGC won.

Mergers, partnerships, and idea sharing are common among today’s ad agencies for large clients. Just recently, former Chief Marketing Officer Joel Ewanik of GM formed a historic ad agency structure between Interpublic’s McCann Worldgroup  and Omnicom’s Goodby, Silverstein, & Partners, called Commonwealth. Unfortunately, this agency structure for Chevy advertising looks to be crumbling.  When creative’s come together to form a greater good for a client they must be able to work well together. Here are a few things Don and Ted, and anyone in this situation for that matter, will have to do to work well together.

  1. Find a new office: If one company just merges into the office of another it  could easily become a turf war. The other company would always be seen as the new guys and not as a merging of equals. A new office allows both companies to feel like the new guy and will allow them to start off on a good note without any mention of whose chair you can or can’t sit in.
  2. Set boundaries: Two creative genius‘ that are used to holding the fate of the entire company in their hands may not have the easiest time consulting each other before they make decisions. For client projects like Chevy they may both have to collaborate, but for the rest of the clients they should divide and conquer. Trying to have two creative heads with very different personalities work together may turn into an episode of Jerry Springer fairly quickly. Setting boundaries will help keep work efficient and effective.
  3. Respect colleagues: Peggy is in a new role and let’s face it, Don can’t just throw twenties in her face anymore. also, there is a whole other creative department that both sides will now have to integrate. Colleagues and superiors alike will need to respect each other’s talents.  If they respect each other, they should be able to collaborate more easily and produce even better work. If colleagues start disrespecting each other, cliques will form and it could be a huge detriment to both ad agencies.
  4. Find common ground: Both companies were doing some amazing work already. Once competitors, they are now a merger of equals. This competitive spirit may get in the way so it is important to find a common ground between colleagues. Understand each other, spend some time together, and understand expectations.

Have you ever been in a situation where a company was bought or merged? Maybe a new client came in and your department doubled? How did you deal with it and what was the outcome?

This article originally published on the Talent Zoo blog Beyond Madison Avenue at: http://www.talentzoo.com/beyond-madison-ave/blog_news.php?articleID=17462

At 102 Years Old, Campbell Ewald’s Still Got It

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Campbell Ewald’s New Detroit Headquarters

Campbell Ewald’s New Detroit Headquarters

While some say Detroit has a long way to go, it is certainly on the upswing. With the idea of an Emergency Financial Manager looming, waiting on a verdict in ex-Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick’s court case and other negative press that surrounds Detroit, there is still a sense of new beginnings. More and more companies are relocating their offices to Detroit since Quicken Loans first started the trend back in 2010.  Campbell Ewald is the next of the presumed many more such companies, especially advertising agencies and creative shops, to relocate to Downtown Detroit.

Rumors have been floating around for some time now, but Campbell Ewald held a press conference yesterday making its plans to move to Detroit official. Their new headquarters will be located in the former J.L. Hudson warehouse next to Ford Field, home of the Detroit Lions. The new outdoor patio actually overlooks the outfield of Comerica Park, home of the American league Champion Detroit Tigers. Ken Burbary, Chief Digital Officer at Campbell Ewald remarked via twitter that “it’s going to certainly make attending games more convenient.”

To attend the press conference the company brought hundreds of its staff to the event in a convoy of school buses. Mayor Dave Bing was on hand to show his support and welcome CE to their new home. The inside of the warehouse is a blank slate now, but come this Christmas this historic building will have a complete face-lift thanks to the skillful hands of architects Neumann/Smith.

Campbell Ewald originally left Detroit for Warren in 1978 to be an earshot away from the GM tech center. Prior to that, CE was actually located in Detroit for 67 years. Leland K. Bassett, Chairman and CEO of Bassett & Bassett Communication Managers, welcomed Campbell Ewald back to Detroit via Twitter saying “We’ve been waiting 36 years for you to join us in Detroit again.”

At the press conference, CEO of Campbell Ewald, Bill Ludwig said, “I think it’s a very vibrant time in the city… it’s part of our DNA and I’m glad it’s being reawakened.” Mayor Dave Bing added “It’s going to take bold visions like Bill has done to bring Detroit back.”

Bill Ludwig and the team of approximately 600 at CE will certainly play a large role in the revitalization of Detroit. With CE now headed back to Detroit, this helps fulfill Dan Gilbert’s vision that he set forth with Opportunity Detroit. “When I graduated, I wanted a job in MI to somehow be a part of Detroit’s revival. Thank you @campbellewald for allowing me to do so,” said Kristen Selasky Account Coordinator at Campbell Ewald via Twitter.

The creativity and ideas flowing out of the heart of Detroit right now are unbelievable. When Frank Campbell and Henry Ewald started the company with 6 other employees in 1911 it is doubtful they would have imagined the company to be as large and agile as it is today. How many companies do you know of that are over 100 years old and still making tracks?