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What Happens in Vegas: Brand Immersion in the American Culture

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whathappensinvegasOnce a brand is so heavily immersed in the American culture, it creates a huge amount of staying power. The brand name turns into a word or phrase used to describe entire categories of products or a lifestyle choice. The perfect example of one brand applying to an entire category is Kleenex.

Growing up i, like many others, did not know the word ’tissue.’ Kleenex is what everyone I knew called them, no matter the brand. To this day, I never use the word tissue. It was something built into my culture as a specific word. When a brand has this amount of pull, the staying power is immense. This of course applies to only one product category. Can you think of a brand that spans the gamut of all product categories?

Cadillac is one such brand. Cadillac has been synonymous with applying as a phrase meaning the “gold standard.” What do mountain biking tips, health care. grilling, power cables and surf shops have in common…

Read the entire article on the Talent Zoo blog Beneath the brand at: http://www.talentzoo.com/beneath-the-brand/blog_news.php?articleID=18181

Cadillac is Back at Hero Status

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bob_ferguson_cadillacOn June 14, 2013, Bob Ferguson, Vice President of Global Cadillac, spoke to a large group of industry professionals at the Adcraft Club of Detroit GM Day. Ferguson is clearly focused on the long-term brand strategy to bring Cadillac back. After some neglect and declining market share for more than thirty years, Cadillac recently has had its highest sales spike since 1976.

Ferguson focused his discussion on Cadillac as an epic tales of sorts. The hero is the automobile, with various sections of the story revealing its true character. Ferguson describes it as a tale with three acts.

  1. Act One: Cadillac is described as the hero in its infancy. It is born. It leads. It is iconic. It holds the virtues of the American public. As many know, Act One lasted for many years, from approximately 1902 through 1976.
  2. Act Two: Things were shifting and the hero that is Cadillac was lazily focusing on size and its past status. Cadillac, the hero, slumped. It was caught off guard by its enemies and the new idea of what an iconic car should be.  Act Two lasted a lot less longer than the previous act, from approximately 1976–2012.
  3. Act Three: Cadillac is described simply as redemption. The hero…

Read my entire article originally published on the Talent Zoo blog Beneath the Brand here: http://www.talentzoo.com/beneath-the-brand/blog_news.php?articleID=17905

Business or Busyness?

The business of advertising, or any business for that matter, can get very hectic. Poor time management skills, unreasonable requests, laziness, and work overload are just some of the reasons, good and bad, for being busy. Business and busyness are nearly identical in spelling. In fact, depending on your regional accent, it may sound the same coming out of your mouth. These terms are closer than just in spelling. Why are they synonymous? Do they have to be?

The answer is no.

How are things going today? Busy.

How many times have you had that verbal exchange with someone in your career? The last month? The last day? With an educated guess, I am confident in saying way too much. Saying “I’m busy” is like saying “I was born a human.” Everybody knows it and no one cares. Being busy is part of having a successful life. Very few people get anywhere without being busy.

When you have a verbal exchange with someone and you simply say “busy,” you are shooting yourself in the foot professionally.

In building your own personal brand, think about a few things:

  1. How many opportunities am I missing out on by saying “I’m busy”? If you tell everyone you’re busy a majority of the time they will stop asking. First they stop asking how you are doing, then they stop asking you to do things. There go the opportunities to form work friendships. If you tell your spouse, parents, siblings, and the like you are too busy, you will start detaching from them as well. Is work so important and so busy that you skip watching a game with your dad, baking Christmas cookies with your mom, or gardening with your spouse? Is work so important that the last time you saw your best friend face-to-face was over a month ago? Life is short and the work/life balance is never easy to handle. However, without maintaining that balance you will never find true happiness.
  2. Will people stop talking to me because my self-programmed quick response was always the same? After people stop asking you how you’re doing or asking you to do things, they will just stop talking to you altogether. You are a downer now. You are too busy. Try brainstorming new responses and physically tell yourself not to use the word as often. Treat it like a swear word and throw a dollar in a jar every time you use it. The responses you start giving people will be more memorable. Instead of saying “busy,” give a short overview of your day or one good thing that happened. People will think more highly of you for that. In Secrets of Closing the Sale, Zig Ziglar says to start out every morning listening to something uplifting. Something exciting to help start your day. Some upbeat music or an inspirational CD will do. You do not necessarily have to go all Rocky Balboa and climb the steps to “Gonna Fly Now,” but it wouldn’t hurt.
  3. What can I do to better control my schedule? Sometimes you may actually have to change a part of your routine. You may not like the change right away but it will help. One thing that helps is coming into work at 7:00 every morning instead of 8:30 or 9 AM. It gives you extra time to start your day and get moving before others come into your office and pull you in a thousand directions. This is just one example, but in this solid uninterrupted two hours you can usually get more done than in an entire eight-hour day.

Next time someone takes the time to ask how your day is going, tell them something memorable. Leave a positive impression on people because it is a small world in any industry, especially advertising. Everyone is busy.

Read the original article on the Talent Zoo blog Beyond Madison Avenue at: http://www.talentzoo.com/beyond-madison-ave/blog_news.php?articleID=17580

Working Through a Client Crisis: Mad Men Philosophies

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Sunday night’s premiere episode of Mad Men showed Peggy in a new light. In her new role she is reminiscent of a young Don Draper in Season 1. This episode, though very entertaining, teaches its professional viewers a thing or two about working through a client crisis. The episode was focused on a campaign for Koss headphones called “Lend Me Your Ears” that was pulled after an unfortunate incident in the Vietnam War. When Peggy was unable to reach the firm’s partner to figure out how to handle the situation, she was left to her own devices.

Working through a client crisis is no picnic, especially when it’s a crisis as socially unacceptable as what she would have had to deal with. Peggy losing out on Christmas vacation is nothing out of the ordinary for many ad agencies today. Here are five things to learn from Peggy Olson on how to best working through a client crisis:

  1. Accept the crisis. Do not get in the way of yourself. By acting upset you are simply wasting time and energy. Move on. When Peggy was presented with this situation she was frustrated but kept it together. She was diligent in sticking to her process of what works, going back to a method that Draper taught her about writing a letter to someone about how much she loved the product.
  2. Open your eyes. Sometimes the best answer is right in front of you. When her live-in boyfriend Abe brought dinner, she did not kick him out. She wanted him to stay and asked him to listen to the music and describe what he heard through the Koss headphones. When she saw Abe bobbing his head to the music she remembered some video footage that came out of her initial session for the “Lend Me Your Ears” campaign. She used what she observed towards the ad. When you open your eyes, many times you will find the answers in the most unexpected circumstances.
  3. Do not try to rebuild Rome. Rome was not built in a day and it could not be rebuilt in a day, either. Developing an advertisement takes thought and time. It is important to use the resources that are around you. As we see here, the ad did not need to be adjusted that much. In the end, it was a much stronger ad. It almost makes you wonder how close you actually are to a much stronger ad when you think you have a good one.
  4. Confidence. Have confidence in yourself and your team to take care of the situation. The client told Peggy what to do but she only considered it as an option and not a great ad. Peggy showed the confidence that she had in herself and the team, reassuring the client that they would have a new ad in time for the Super Bowl. Showing confidence allows others to trust in what you believe is right. It makes a big difference in almost any situation, whether it is business or life.
  5. Go the extra mile. Let’s face it. Peggy got lucky with the extra footage to prevent a reshoot. Next time you have an ad, go the extra mile and keep other material on hand from the start. Shoot a little extra or write a little more just in case. Once the ad is complete, it may even be worth revisiting a couple days later to bring a fresh set of eyes to it. The key here is to be ready for anything at a moment’s notice. After all, you would rather put a little more into an idea up front and prevent a future crisis, wouldn’t you?

Have you been in a similar situation as Peggy Olson from Mad Men? How have you dealt with the situation? What could you have done better?

Read the original article on the Talent Zoo blog Beyond Madison Avenue at: http://www.talentzoo.com/beyond-madison-ave/blog_news.php?articleID=17306

Starting an Agency Includes Cultivating REALationships

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Bilal Saeed and Tim Adkins, Brofounders Pakmode

Bilal Saeed and Tim Adkins, Brofounders
Pakmode

“Deflate your ego.” This is one of the first things Bilal Saeed, Brofouder of Michigan-based Pakmode Media + Marketing, said to a packed house at TEDxEMU on March 15, 2013 at Eastern Michigan University’s Quirk Theater. Alongside Saeed, was Brofounder Tim Adkins, who leads creative direction at the agency. The creative duo’s discussion focused on building REALationships, and not just relationships, to stay successful in business and life.

When starting the agency fresh out of college in 2008 they quickly understood what hard work meant. Upon their first day of business, an advisor gave Saeed a small needle. He was unsure what it was for but the advisor simply said that Saeed will know soon enough. He kept the needle and got to work. Many times, Saeed and Adkins, found themselves washing dishes and waiting tables at a local restaurant after a full day of work just to pay the bills.

Thousands of clean dishes later, it dawned on the Brofounders that the needle was to deflate their ego.

Brofounders, by the way, is what they decided to name themselves instead of the formal CEO or COO since they were together much of their waking lives. The name stemmed from when they first heard brothers John and Scott Meyer of 9 Clouds refer to themselves as ‘Brofounders.’

Saeed and Adkins realized that deflating their ego was only the first part of the process. To create, grow, and maintain REALationships, there are actually four key ideas to keep in mind, especially when starting your own agency, as follows:

  1. Deflate your ego: This was their first and most vital lesson. It is important to remember that you are not automatically entitled to anything you do not earn. If you want something you must work hard to achieve it. Nothing will be given to you. They say to “Grind because you believe in something greater.”
  2. Be a chameleon: Adkins reluctantly lets Saeed talk about this point since he focuses so much on it. However, in creating REALationships it is important to know your surroundings and adapt as you need to. Do not be afraid of change and allow yourself the ability to be prepared for all situations as they arise. You may be in a tough situation and your next client may or may not be watching you. Saeed exceeded one man’s expectations so much with the way that he went out of his way to adapt for another client at an event that he landed the Little Caesar’s Pizza Bowlaccount on the spot.
  3. Being selfless without being selfish: The Dalai Lama once said, “Our prime purpose in life is to help others.” The Brofounders keep this in their mind daily. Their goals are focused on helping others first and acting for no personal gain. This allows them to be better people and better corporate citizens.
  4. Being a real, better person: This last point is best assimilated to being a child again. Simple things that people forget over the years are to share, say please and thank you, and remember to be nice. And do not forget, the ransparency of this niceness factor should be shown through all social media channels.

At the completion of their TEDxEMU talk, Saeed and Adkins made note that these four points are easier to say and harder to do. This is not a sales technique, but rather a lifestyle. They truly believe in the working capacity of each of these key points and have made them part of daily life. “Do not fake it,” says Adkins. People will see right through the exterior. It is truly important to be a better listener and to care about the REALationships you make. What will you do to turn your relationships into REALationships?

Read the entire article on Talent Zoo’s beyond Madison Avenue at: http://www.talentzoo.com/beyond-madison-ave/blog_news.php?articleID=17244

How to Throw the Ultimate Mad Men Premiere Party

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mad_men_amc_tv_season_6Don those skinny ties and freshen up, it is Mad Men season. The highly anticipated season six of Mad Men is sure to break new ground, but since we have yet to know the year the show will be based in, let’s start where we left off. To throw a great Mad Men season premiere party you need a couple of things: friends, atmosphere and food. Let’s just assume you have the friends part covered and start with atmosphere, shall we?

To throw the ultimate Mad Men season six premiere party, there are a nine essentials to nail down, as follows:

  1. Music: Since music was one of the biggest reflections of 1960s culture it comes first on our list.  If you are a fan of the show you may already have a record player, but if not, ask a friend to bring one over. Next you want some great music to play. If you need records too, there are always local record shops happy to sell you some 45s (vintage singles). After all, it would not be very Mad Men of you to have a iPod playing the songs. However, if that is all you can find, it will do. Look for some of the billboard top 40 songs from the mid-1960s. If you are able to get a record player it is not a bad idea to pick up a copy of Jessica Pare singing Zou Bisou, Bisou on vinyl to really set the scene.
  2. Items from the set: What? How can I buy items from the show? You cannot. You can, however, find show-related items at local vintage or antique stores. In a recent excursion this weekend I went to four vintage shops and found a glass bottle of Patio, a lucky strike ad, a tie bar, a matchbook from a vintage Hilton Hotel, some skinny ties and a chip bowl made out of a 1960s Rolling Stones record. To throw a great Mad Men party you have to get creative, like Draper. Sometimes that means rummaging through someone’s old stuff. And yes, it is always worth it.
  3. Dress code: Set one. It is not only fun for a change but it keeps the atmosphere in check. If you do not want to buy clothes chances are you have something you can pull out of your closet that will fit the bill. Just watch the show for five minutes and you will get tons of ideas from Janie Bryant’s creative costume designs. Speaking of Bryant,  if you do not have anything in your closet, you can either go back to the vintage shops or pick up something from Janie’s new Banana Republic Mad Men collection. If all else fails, no jeans.
  4. Taste of the times: No pizza tonight folks. The food should reflect the era as well. That is not to say you must have a pot roast and baked Alaska. Just make sure that food ideas come from things that were popular or at least available in the 1960s. Assuming you are from a non-smoking household, grab a couple of packs of candy cigarettes.  Remember, this party is themed to stand out from a normal party at your house. Put a bowl of nuts out, unless you can find of bag of Utz potato chips. As a fan of Mad Men you may very well know, ‘Utz are better than nuts.’
  5. Remove the screens. Your TV is fine, of course, but leave smartphones and computers out of sight. You may actually remember how to interact with people without all of the modern distractions. Having a vintage phone in the kitchen would complete the look. This may be easier to find than you realize. I was able to find a mustard yellow rotary dial phone in my parent’s basement just a few weeks ago.
  6. Glimpse of the past. Achieve a glimpse into life in the 1960s by placing out a few vintage magazines on the ottoman. If nothing else, you and your friends will have a good laugh at all of the new and improved items that were all the rage back then. In my same excursion over the weekend I picked up 1966 editions of Life, Motor Trend, and Better Homes and Gardens magazines.
  7. Set the DVR. Two reasons here. The first is because if you miss any part of the episode while hosting the party you will probably want to catch up later. As an example, I think my wife and I watched a total of 10 minutes of the Super Bowl this year between the two of us. A second reason to set the DVR is to have some television on in the background. You can either play episodes of Mad Men season five from early morning reruns on AMC or 1960s programs that are currently on TV such as Dick Van Dyke, The Donna Reed Show, Andy Griffith, Bonanza, or Bewitched.
  8. Keep the party going. Cards were a popular way for adults to pass the time is years gone by. If you do not know how to play bridge, or you think it is just an efficient way to get over a body of water, charades was another popular game. You can also wander down to the art department and get some colored pencils for a lively game of Pictionary. Finally, as in Season 2 episode “The Jet Set,” you could play a game where one person names an international city and the next person has to use the last letter to name the next city, and so forth.
  9. Bar in your living room. I saved the best for last. You have secretly always wanted to do this and now you can; put a bar in your living room. Stock it heavily and get some tasty recipes from yesteryear. Start with the Mad Men cocktail guide or just do a little Google search for some of the classic drinks.  Heineken beer could also be on hand to pay homage to Betty’s around the world dinner party from the Season 2 Episode “A Night to Remember.”

The key is to have a different party-going experience. Try not to get wrapped up in the same party ideas, but please leave the John Deere riding lawnmower in the garage. For more tips, see the Mad Men Party Planner or watch any of the last five seasons of Mad Men for inspiration. And remember, no talking about the baby and Don gets the big steak.

RFP Responses: 5 Simple Reminders for Success

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Don’t go it alone.

Don’t go it alone.

When a Request for Proposal (RFP) comes in from a potential client to your ad agency you feel one of two things. Either you are excited for the opportunity or you are dreading the long hours it will take to complete. No matter how you feel about it, it is always important to set yourself up for success.

Setting yourself up for success may not seem like something you have to pay attention to. Of course, everyone wants to succeed in their career. However, if you approach RFP responses without a proven process you may be doomed. There are entire companies out there who are dedicated to helping you navigate the RFP process; believe me, I have spoke with them. Here are five steps that will help you respond to RFPs more effectively:

  1. Read, Read, Read: Read the entire request. So many times, people get excited over the opportunity and begin glossing over things. Do not assume the text is standard or that you have seen it before. Carefully take your time to read this document because there may be a few things such as type of submission or how the footer should look that could disqualify you from the process. Miss one of these things and they will just throw your response out. It may sound harsh, but it happens. I will say it again, read it. After all, you want them to read your response.
  2. Timing: Set a schedule and give your team the wrong due dates. Yes, you read that correctly. Set your team up for success by giving a one-day buffer, minimum. There are many steps to completing an RFP response. If one person turns their review or updated text in a day, or even a few hours, late, it throws off the whole team. A solid buffer is always needed. Now, the team will readjust to make up for the lost time, so do not be so quick to give up your day just yet. There is always something at the last minute you may need that extra day for.
  3. Define Responsibilities: Divide and conquer. So many times there are one or two people that try to complete the RFP response all by themselves. This is not the key to success. Build a strong team first and foremost. Not everyone has to be involved for the entire process, but many people can be involved for parts of the process. Different sections can come from different internal Subject Matter Experts (SMEs). This allows the coordinator of the process to be able to focus more on making the response more cohesive and less focused on just “filling it out.”
  4. Re-Read: Re-read the entire proposal once you think it is complete, including drop-in text, to make sure it works. Drop-in text is a good way to save time, especially when you’re offering services that are more standardized. However, you want to make sure the proposal has a cohesive story. Have other internal stakeholders perform clean reads as well. They may be able to add some last-minute polish to the response that you would not catch otherwise.
  5. Quality Control: Let someone not involved in the response read it and perform an independent quality check. For best results, a quality checklist and formal process for review should be in place. One of the most obvious but important checks is to make sure no other company name is included. It almost sounds too obvious but it happens more than you probably even realize.

A good RFP response could win you business that may last far beyond your years with an advertising agency. These five steps will help you ensure that there are no simple hiccups that may disclude your ad agency from the process. The creative part of the response is up to you. What would you consider as the sixth simple reminder for RFP success?

Read the original article on the Talent Zoo blog Beyond Madison Avenue at: http://www.talentzoo.com/beyond-madison-ave/blog_news.php?articleID=17165

At 102 Years Old, Campbell Ewald’s Still Got It

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Campbell Ewald’s New Detroit Headquarters

Campbell Ewald’s New Detroit Headquarters

While some say Detroit has a long way to go, it is certainly on the upswing. With the idea of an Emergency Financial Manager looming, waiting on a verdict in ex-Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick’s court case and other negative press that surrounds Detroit, there is still a sense of new beginnings. More and more companies are relocating their offices to Detroit since Quicken Loans first started the trend back in 2010.  Campbell Ewald is the next of the presumed many more such companies, especially advertising agencies and creative shops, to relocate to Downtown Detroit.

Rumors have been floating around for some time now, but Campbell Ewald held a press conference yesterday making its plans to move to Detroit official. Their new headquarters will be located in the former J.L. Hudson warehouse next to Ford Field, home of the Detroit Lions. The new outdoor patio actually overlooks the outfield of Comerica Park, home of the American league Champion Detroit Tigers. Ken Burbary, Chief Digital Officer at Campbell Ewald remarked via twitter that “it’s going to certainly make attending games more convenient.”

To attend the press conference the company brought hundreds of its staff to the event in a convoy of school buses. Mayor Dave Bing was on hand to show his support and welcome CE to their new home. The inside of the warehouse is a blank slate now, but come this Christmas this historic building will have a complete face-lift thanks to the skillful hands of architects Neumann/Smith.

Campbell Ewald originally left Detroit for Warren in 1978 to be an earshot away from the GM tech center. Prior to that, CE was actually located in Detroit for 67 years. Leland K. Bassett, Chairman and CEO of Bassett & Bassett Communication Managers, welcomed Campbell Ewald back to Detroit via Twitter saying “We’ve been waiting 36 years for you to join us in Detroit again.”

At the press conference, CEO of Campbell Ewald, Bill Ludwig said, “I think it’s a very vibrant time in the city… it’s part of our DNA and I’m glad it’s being reawakened.” Mayor Dave Bing added “It’s going to take bold visions like Bill has done to bring Detroit back.”

Bill Ludwig and the team of approximately 600 at CE will certainly play a large role in the revitalization of Detroit. With CE now headed back to Detroit, this helps fulfill Dan Gilbert’s vision that he set forth with Opportunity Detroit. “When I graduated, I wanted a job in MI to somehow be a part of Detroit’s revival. Thank you @campbellewald for allowing me to do so,” said Kristen Selasky Account Coordinator at Campbell Ewald via Twitter.

The creativity and ideas flowing out of the heart of Detroit right now are unbelievable. When Frank Campbell and Henry Ewald started the company with 6 other employees in 1911 it is doubtful they would have imagined the company to be as large and agile as it is today. How many companies do you know of that are over 100 years old and still making tracks?

NBCUniversal Says Loyalty Has Declined

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curvenotesAfter my haircut this weekend at local old school barbershop Roger and Rod’s, Rod asked me if I needed more hairspray to get me to my next appointment. “Sure,” I said without hesitation. Rod’s place is actually so classic that they do not actually accept credit, cash or check only. After I told him I did not have cash, Rod said “You’ll pay me next time.” I was stuck in my tracks. When was the last time you heard that? Even after I offered to go to the ATM and come back he said not to worry and to just remind him next time. Now, I have only been to Rod’s twice but he trusts me and my word alone. That solidified me as a loyal customer. Rod helped me step back in time to realize that the honor system and loyalty are lost in this day and age. This story is the preface to a few my notes taken from NBC Universal’s latest research for advertisers from The Curve Report.

The bi-yearly Curve Report is based on extensive surveys performed within the 18–49 year old market. At an event hosted by Adcraft and NBCUniversal last week in Birmingham, Melissa Lavigne-Deville announced that loyalty in today’s society exists on a 6–12 month cycle a majority of the time. As NBCUniversal’s Vice President Trends & Strategic Insights, Melissa knows her trends intimately. Discussing this further, she pointed out that loyalty does not exist like it did for parents and grandparents in days gone by. Melissa pointed out that this trend is important especially for automotive advertisers. Think about it; this is not even the length of an automobile lease.

Just a few years ago, loyalty was one of the keys to getting business done in society. You had a ‘guy’ for everything. Most people can think back to that one place their parents always used to go to eat, a beer your dad always drank, one brand of car that your family had to drive, and the list of ones go on. The shifting digital landscape has given younger generations more options. According to NBCUniversal, a fourth dimension has been created. One in which smartphones are changing our neighborhoods and making a personal grid, akin to what Melissa describes as a “topographic light bright.”

Gen Xers and Millennials have shaped, with the help of technology, a new future for business and the way advertisers reach out to consumers. It is up to advertisers, strategic thinkers, and innovators to cultivate the next wave of loyalty. To give consumers an online experience similar to my offline experience at Roger and Rod’s Barber Shop. The statistic of loyalty surviving on a 6–12 month timetable is not an easy pill to swallow. It is your job to figure out how to be the minority and to increase your client’s satisfaction enough to keep them coming back past the average drop off.

What do you do in your business to attract and retain loyal customers? What could you be doing better?

Read the original article on the Talent Zoo blog Beyond Madison Avenue at:  http://www.talentzoo.com/beyond-madison-ave/blog_news.php?articleID=17077

Brain Science in Brand Building

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“60 Seconds: How to tell your company’s story & the brain science that makes it stick” is a little book with a big message. Seriously, the book is shorter than Miley Cyrus’ new haircut. However, it tells you exactly what you need to do to build your company’s brand through the consumers eye via video. A video can engage the audience and leave them with a lasting impression if done right. Author Andrew Angus, Founder and CEO of Switch Video, lays out the process and a look into his proven strategy. Here are a four key points that everyone should take away from this book:

  1. Keep the story simple: Simple storytelling is best. The slogan of Angus’ company is “Explain what you do.” It may sound too simple, and you may say ‘we already do that.’ Truthfully, very few companies get this right. Let your point come across as cleanly as possible. Save the details for later. Most of all, just keep it simple.
  2. Create new old memories: Do this by connecting the past with the present. You can create these new old memories by bringing up an experience, a mindset, or an issue that has been occurring or has occurred for some time. This allows a potential client to connect you with a thought that is deeply rooted in their mind. They will right away store your brand values with these thoughts. Similar to the simplicity factor, do not overload potential clients with too much data or detail. If there are too many new ideas to connect, they will never remember them.
  3. Metaphors expand understanding: You are in the business to solve a problem. No matter what project or service it is, it solves a problem or fulfills a need. Break the story down so it is easy to remember your value-add by using metaphors to your advantage. In the book, Angus describes a brand building video for dog owners seeking playmates for their pups as “eHarmony for dogs.” Without explaining any more of it you understand the concept right away. Metaphors expand the reach of your product or service.
  4. Stimulate both auditory and visual senses: “I know that feeling.” Getting potential customers to say this is one of the biggest keys. Make them realize you care about their issues and understand them. Once you make it there, it is cake.

These four key points work for more than just brand-building videos. It is also easy to put them into your new client pitch. One astounding example Angus describes is focused on Collingwood General & Marine Hospital in Canada. Apparently 70% of the equipment used in hospitals in Canada comes from private funding and is not provided as part of national healthcare. Private donations make up that 70% while the remaining 30% is covered by Canada itself. The video Angus and his team created for the hospital depicted what it would be like in an emergency room if only 30% of the equipment was available to its customers (patients). Imagine that scene. This video changed the way potential donors saw the situation that they have been trying to explain for decades. Brain science works. It just takes a little knowledge and a little handbook.

How would a little brain science help your brand?

Read the original article on the Talent Zoo blog Beneath the Brand at: http://www.talentzoo.com/beneath-the-brand/blog_news.php?articleID=16998