Advertorious

Advertorious News & Blog

Monthly archives "January 2013"

Why Radio Will Never Die

advertorious 0 Comments

bob-pittmanOver the last couple of years the argument that radio is a waste of time and money has surfaced. We hear estimates on when radio will die. Millions of people are seen daily with iPods stuck in their ears. One could start to see where people would think radio may have a hard time continuing. Who better to speak on this topic but none other than Bob Pittman, CEO of Clear Channel Radio and founder of MTV? Last year, the Adcraft Club of Detroit brought in Pittman to speak during the advertising club’s annual Radio Day.

“Radio is America’s companion,” said Pittman, who commanded the stage from the start. “It’s the first social media.” Think about how social radio really is. There are disc jockeys who bring you curated content, events hosted in your local area, you can call in to interact, and now you can even tweet, message, and share with them as well. With radio advertising, it is one of the most flexible forms of media. One can change the copy of an advertisement in a single day. In radio, commercials also have many forms and for its reach is relatively inexpensive to create. Not only are they inexpensive to create but they are much less expensive to run as well. For local advertising especially, Pittman says, “Radio is the king of local.”

Bob Pittman also reminded us advertisers of something that we can tend to forget about: “It’s very close to the point of purchase.” Driving in a car, walking through a store, and streaming on the computer at work or home, radio is there to remind consumers about their product or service. Wouldn’t it be convenient if you were hungry and while you were driving were reminded that McDonald’s had a new juicy, tasty burger to fulfill all of your non-diet-food cravings? You are already in the car and next thing you know you spot a McDonald’s. That is the point. Radio is where consumers are. Nobody can honestly say they do not hear radio at least once a day. Whether you are walking down the street, at a store, in your car, in someone else’s car, or just about anywhere else, radio is there.

In speaking about digital radio Pittman let us in on a little secret, saying, “Digital is 5% of radio listening, it’s just the beginning.” Clear Channel Radio-owned iHeartRadio has helped change online radio listening by allowing you to listen to over 1,500 live radio stations online. Compared to some of the other “radio” sites such as Pandora and Spotify, he says they are “massive collections, not radio.” Pittman reminded us again why live radio will always work and always be a viable advertising medium, radio is social. He explained why radio is social in six points saying, radio:

  1. Is curated
  2. Changes constantly
  3. Has human beings to bond with the audience
  4. Has big brands with strong, loyal audiences
  5. Local content, promotion, and events
  6. Has an interactive relationship with the audience

The biggest takeaway from the meeting was, everybody has a radio. While radio may no longer be the first thing everyone thinks of, it is where everyone is. How many times a day do you hear a radio? Once you start really paying attention you may be surprised.

Article originally published on the Talent Zoo blog Beyond Madison Avenue at: http://www.talentzoo.com/beyond-madison-ave/blog_news.php?articleID=16626

5 Tricks for Effective Conference Calls

advertorious 0 Comments

conference-callA conference call is scheduled to discuss your brand or business. The times comes, you take a seat, dial the number, and stare while speaking at the phone. This is the course of most conference calls, but it does not have to be.

In today’s day and age, sitting down and having a discussion in person is not always an option. With teleconferencing services, WebEx, Skype, and a multitude of other choices, it is far less a priority to have an in-person meeting. Some calls may be more informal than others, but each call should be treated with the same level of detail. Here are five tricks that come from past experiences with a little help from Peter Coughter’s The Art of the Pitch.

  1. You do not have to sit down. It is okay to stand and move around. If this is a new business presentation you should still do the same things as you would do if they were sitting in front of you. However, by moving around it does not mean getting distracted by doing something else.
  2. Have at least one other colleague in the room. When someone else is there, you can look at them and focus this call as if you are having a discussion. This will not only help make the call more comfortable, but it will make it more personal. When you are looking at the phone it is hard to gauge the reactions of the other side unless they specifically say how they are feeling. This other colleague should be able to help provide you with that feedback instantaneously.
  3. Do not mute the phone to talk to others in the room. There is one exception. Only when you truly must discuss something very quickly before mentioning it to a client can you do this. Otherwise, refrain. In my experience the mute button is used by others to question the client or make unnecessary remarks. When you mute the phone in these cases, you miss things. Stay attentive throughout the entire call. Then, have a discussion afterwards to go over next steps.
  4. Dress to impress. For the phone, seriously? Yes. It is important because when you look good and smell good, you feel good. When you feel good, you present even better. When you present better, you win. While your jeans from college might be the most comfy pants in the world, they are not meant for these situations. “Work clothes” do not have to be boring or uncomfortable. Find what works best for you, find a good tailor, and find your way towards that corner office.
  5. Smile. It can be heard in your voice. Next time there is a conference call, record it. Listen back to it for presentation value. How do you and your colleagues sound? You may be surprised by what you hear. Think about where you can inject your smile. When you are presenting over the phone, the pitch and tone of your voice matter more than anything.

Each trick is less of a trick and more of challenge. It is a challenge to rethink the way we as professionals make a conference call. If you have not noticed, the challenges bring along one underlying goal: Treat it like you were there in person. If you would not do it with your client in the room, you should not do it while on the phone with them. What is your biggest hurdle with conference calls?

Article originally published on the Talent Zoo blog Beneath the Brand at: http://www.talentzoo.com/beneath-the-brand/blog_news.php?articleID=16555

The Importance of Typography to Logo and Brand

advertorious 0 Comments

chevrolet“A logo is not a brand unless it’s on a cow,” says AdamsMorioka in the Logo Design Workbook. The way consumers view a company builds the brands perception. This starts with the logo but travels far beyond. A logo, a good logo, starts with a study of what the company is and what it is trying to achieve.  What does the font in your logo and marketing materials convey?

Disclaimer: If you think ‘Comic Sans’ is a viable font choice stop reading now.

In the Logo Design Workbook, typography is described as “pictures of words.” Each typeface can bring out a different meaning. Have you ever tried typing the same word 20 times all with different typefaces? Do it now. I will be here.

Now look at what you see. It is the same word 20 times but with 20 different meanings, some slightly and some drastically different. Performing a study of diverse typefaces can be very important, and in high-profile cases may be necessary, to discover options for the brand.

In some instances it may be necessary to create a new typeface altogether. In a meeting of the Detroit InDesign User Group at Schoolcraft College on November 15, 2012, Eric Weir and Martin Smith fromGoodby, Silverstein and Partners Detroit stepped in to discuss their techniques and thought processes behind the 2013 Chevrolet catalogs. Among other design elements, Eric and “Marty” went into detail about the importance of font choice. In the case of the Chevy catalogs they actually commissioned two completely new fonts to be created. One unidentified attendee in the question and answers session said, “You don’t want your plumbing company to look like a Mexican restaurant!” While a plumbing company looking like a Mexican restaurant may sound like a stretch, it is not to some uneducated in the importance of font choice.

For a plumbing company it may be easier to find a font that would work well compared to the largest automaker in the world, but in both cases it is important. The logo should be built with the font choice in mind if at all possible. Since William Durant and Louis Chevrolet probably did not consider this in the early 1900s, we can give them a break. However, the Chevy logo is a great example of how a brand can go through a number of modifications and still stay true to its brand identity.

The logo, the typeface within it, and the corporate identity all go hand in hand. If this seems like an introduction to type it was not meant to be. It is just simply a reminder that something as simple as a typeface can change everything your company, or your client’s company, stands for. What does your company’s font choice evoke?

Article originally published on Talent Zoo for Beneath the Brand at: http://www.talentzoo.com/beneath-the-brand/blog_news.php?articleID=16411